July212014

comickergirl:

whisperwhisk:

i just realized a SUDDEN AND BURNING NEED for Ed and Hiccup to hang out together.

discussing alchemy. and dragons. and research methods.

comparing prostheses.

being ENORMOUS NERDS.

image

(via viria)

11AM
l-a-l-o-u:

Jinora’s going to be the tallest because of reasons

l-a-l-o-u:

Jinora’s going to be the tallest because of reasons

(via viria)

2AM
8bit-ace:

8bit-ace:

the new slogan for tumblr.com

i will not rest until this gets a million notes

8bit-ace:

8bit-ace:

the new slogan for tumblr.com

i will not rest until this gets a million notes

(via ladyvanellope)

2AM

the witch and her demon

(Source: mercenary-tributary, via oldandnewfirm)

July202014

glittorus:

sweetdtakestheworld:

ofpersephoneandpomegranates:

my only problem with this is that it tries to say that some languages are more complex than others. Linguistically, no language is more complex than another. 

I don’t think they are trying to say one language is more complex than another at it’s base, just that some are more complex in differences from this specific native language.

Languages are also related to one another in different ways. You can actually search for images of this family tree that includes extinct languages to show the development and progression of modern ones. It’s harder for speakers of some other languages to learn because their languages are less related to English (or at least their modern versions are more distantly related from). I do believe some languages are more complex than others in terms of the number and ambiguity of rules, speed of language, and tones. All languages develop to serve the needs of the people who speak them; this is why they constantly evolve. These rules are not arbitrary or unnecessary. They are not an accident.In some form or fashion, the complicated aspects of these languages actually make communication easier to the people who speak them.

(Source: beben-eleben, via oldandnewfirm)

2PM

perplexingly:

geosaurus:

perplexingly:

Imagine dragons sleeping the same way giraffes do

image

Yessss! I wanna draw sleeping dragons tooo

Maybe they sleep like camels…image

or cats…

image

or…. uh… snakes?

image

Yeeeeaaaaah

Or maybe they sleep on trees

image

(via cephalopodcrossing)

1PM

inarina:

Based on a conversation I had with my brother

WE TALK ABOUT JEAN A LOT

(via viria)

July52014

16stolenxpaperthin:

bros before hos && sisters before misters

Prioritizing relationships: you’re doing it right
I am just full of commentary right now but can I pretty please just point out how much I love the fact that the stupid romantic triangle/quadrangle shit that that they all got in to didn’t interfere with their frankly more  important relationships as friends/brothers?

SHOUTOUT
To dakorra, korravatar, youpjuice, and teabend: thank you very much for including me in your follow forevers. You made my month! :3

(via avatarparallels)

3PM

4CHAN IS PLANNING ON HACKING ACCOUNTS.

pastafox:

If you see this somewhere on my blog, this means I am NOT a 4Channer.

If I start posting gore and porn, THAT IS NOT ME. I HAVE BEEN HACKED.

If you want to reblog this, take a screenshot of it on your blog so that you have solid proof.

(via narsilshards)

12PM

odditiesoflife:

The Most Intense Color of Any Living Thing on Earth

Also known as the marble berry, Pollia condensata is a wild plant that grows in the forests of several African countries. The berries are not edible, but they have an extremely rare property. They produce the most intense color of any living thing on Earth. Even after the berries have been picked from the plant, they stay the same shiny, vibrant, metallic blue color for many decades.

The vast majority of colors in the biological world are produced by pigments—compounds produced by a living organism that selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light, so that they appear to be the color of whichever wavelengths they reflect.

However, the marble berry’s skin has no pigment. The berries produce their vibrant blue color through nanoscale-sized cellulose strands that scatter light as they interact with one another. Thus the fruit’s color is even visible at the cellular level as pictured above.

(Source: blogs.smithsonianmag.com, via measurementoftheobserver)

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