September222014
September212014
September192014

bridgioto:

Bravest Warriors #24 is coming out next week, with this cover I did for it! Here’s some of the process work - I included some explanations this time. I don’t know if it’ll be helpful at all or just… verbose… but hopefully there’s something useful in there :>

1. Thumbnail

2. Tight sketch

3. Rough values painted underneath the sketch

4. Value painting on top of the sketch to tighten things up

5. Flat colors! Regular area fill for set pieces, and a few color/overlay layers to quickly indicate hues in the painting

6. Set lighting: using multiply layers to indicate the overall scene lighting raking across the wall, working out how that will interact with the portrait painting and lead the eye. Also continuing to paint in regular layers on top of the portrait.

7. Warming/brightening up the scene lighting, picking out highlights on the frame, softening some form shadow edges to add dimension, adding some rimlight to Catbug. Continuing to work up the portrait. Adding occlusion shadows under the frame and curtains.

8. Using a lighten layer to better expose and unify the areas of the scene struck by light. Lightening the shadow areas a bit to raise overall tone and prevent stuff from getting lost or too dark.

9. Pushing the lights even further to get a stronger afternoon-light feel and create better separation between light and shadow. Adding a soft glow around the light edges. And dust mote sparkles! :>

2PM

maxkirin:

A kind follower reminded me of that '7 Cardinal Rules of Life' post going around, and they asked me if I would ever do my take on them (that being, a writerly take). Well, seeing as how I’ve been running a Writer Positivity series for over 100 posts, I thought it would be a fun chance to collect some of my favorite advice!

PS: The above are not meant to be taken as ‘literal’ rules for writing, but rather advice for leading the lifestyle of a writer~ ♥︎

Looking for more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

(via jessiedoodles)

2PM
toffany:

I get how-to, and process related questions a lot - so I decided to make a quick example of my step by step. I hope this helps! 

toffany:

I get how-to, and process related questions a lot - so I decided to make a quick example of my step by step. I hope this helps! 

2PM

thekimonogallery:

Kyoto, Japan.  May 1, 2014.  Photography by Nobuhiro Suhara on Flickr

(Source: Flickr / nobuflickr)

2PM

tally-art:

schweizercomics:

yamino:

thedragonflywarrior:

The Body Shapes of the World’s Best Athletes Compared Side By Side

Health and fitness comes in all shapes and sizes. Every single one of these athletes is a certified bad-ass.

I’ve posted this before but it’s worth reblogging!

Just a reminder - if you’re drawing a team superhero book and more than one of your characters has the same build YOU’RE DOING IT ALL WRONG

Always reblog

(via oldandnewfirm)

2PM

freeglassart said: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

typette:

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

it’s nice to see how others do stuff like this, everyone is different but there’s something to learn from everybody!

1PM

untamableshipper said: Hi! Do you have any tips on drawing body figures? Especially the length of the legs? And do you have tips on drawing hands? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Only way to learn figures is to look at them and draw them.  I’ve taken figure drawing and anatomy for artist classes in addition to drawing a lot.  Take them if you can!  And I fuck up legs more than anything because I don’t draw them enough.  Easy springboard though is searching for Andrew Loomis books.

Same with hands, though there are some fairly easy to describe formulas for hands so I drew up a couple rq

First of all, for probably 90% of the hand poses you’re gonna draw, think fingers like the petals on a pinwheel.  They all curve the same degree, in relation to the previous.  

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1PM

monasticmaestoso:

open the doop, get on the floop. everybody walk the dinosoop

(Source: klefable, via dieoware)

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